Night Sky Watch: The moon helps Mommyo find Regulus

The moon will be right next to Regulus, the brightest star in the Leo constellation tonight. (Illustration: Andrew Fazekas of SkySafari)

The moon will be right next to Regulus, the brightest star in the Leo constellation tonight. (Illustration: Andrew Fazekas of SkySafari)

Although I am fascinated by the stars, I’m not terribly good at identifying them. Tonight, though, the moon’s going to help me out. Andrew Fazekas, who writes on the night sky for National Geographic, tells me that tonight, the moon will be hanging out next to Regulus, the brightest star in the Leo constellation. That might just be enough to help me pick Regulus (and Leo himself) out.

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About Shala Howell

I spent two decades helping companies like Bell Labs, Juniper Networks, and a genetic testing company that was later acquired by CVS translate some of the world’s most complicated concepts into actionable, understandable English. Now I'm working on a much harder problem -- fostering children’s curiosity and engagement in the scientific, artistic, and linguistic world that surrounds them. The first book in my Caterpickles Parenting Series, What’s That, Mom?, focuses on how to use public art to nurture children’s curiosity in the world around them. My next book, Did Dinosaurs Have Belly Buttons?, is currently planned for release in 2018. In the meantime, you can find me blogging about life with a very curious Ten-Year-Old at Caterpickles.com, chatting about books and the writing life at BostonWriters.blog, and tweeting about books, writing, science, & things that make me smile at @shalahowell.
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One Response to Night Sky Watch: The moon helps Mommyo find Regulus

  1. rayworth1973 says:

    Deep within the realm of galaxies. I hope the weather’s clear the next new moon. I’m just sayin’.

    Oh, and after 50+ years as a visual observer, I don’t know the names of hardly any of the stars. After 50 years of manually finding 2,000 faint fuzzy objects in the sky, I finally broke down and bought a digital setting circle setup for my telescope. However, when setting it up, each evening, I have to align it with two major stars. Of course, they use the “names” of the stars in the setup software. Now, here’s old Fred who doesn’t know diddly about star names! So, I had to look them all up on star charts and print those key stars out so I could find them all when I go out for an observing session. I know a few of them but if I’m ever in a situation where I have to pick and choose, I’m often lost. I know star patterns as well, but don’t ask me the constellations because half the time I get them wrong, or the wrong borders. Why? Because I don’t care!

    I could never do the “Star Tours” our club puts on at outreach events we do every month. Yet when it comes to finding objects in the sky…

    Like

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