Fostering curiosity in kids (and their parents) since 2011

Posts tagged ‘parenting’

stuffed penguin looking at a manmade fountain on the hospital grounds

How can you keep kids in the loop when you visit a sick relative without them?

My father has been having a few health issues lately, which have resulted in my flying down to Texas a couple of times to help out with this and that. My daughter, being the curious and caring sort, has had all sorts of questions about what’s going on with Grandpa. Respecting both my father’s need for privacy and my daughter’s desire for answers has been challenging at times. On my last trip, I accidentally hit upon a good solution. I thought I’d share it with you in case you also wanted to try it.

My daughter waves to Sue the T-Rex back in the days when Sue lived in the main hall of the Field Museum in Chicago.

What’s so important about fostering curiosity anyway? 

I’ve been doing a fair amount of reading and thinking about curiosity lately. One of the first articles I came across was by Daisy Yuhas of the Hechinger Report. In it, she talks about a set of studies that demonstrate that curious people are happier in their jobs, better at social interactions, and enjoy greater academic success. Reader, I had questions.

Book Review: Pack of Dorks

If I could change one thing about parenting, it would be to have it commonly accepted that parents & kids should keep reading books together well into middle school. My fifth grader and I both read Beth Vrabel’s Pack of Dorks this past weekend and it opened up so many excellent conversations about friendship, bullying, and having the courage to be your own person.

Book Review: Little Girls Can Be Mean

This week, instead of telling you about what my daughter’s reading, I want to tell you about a great book I’m reading. Friendship challenges in K-6 are just as complicated and emotionally fraught as ever. In Little Girls Can Be Mean, Michelle Anthony and Reyna Lindert describe a simple, four-step process that parents can use to teach their children to navigate these tricky social situations on their own.